More <
bookmarks-menu

Live zoster (shingles) vaccine, ZVL - what you need to know

Please note: information for this vaccine can be found here.

Text only

Review Date: 11/1/2019

Reviewed By

David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Editorial update 03/10/2022.

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Live zoster (shingles) vaccine, ZVL. www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/shingles.html. Updated October 30, 2019. Accessed November 1, 2019.

Disclaimer

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

All
Videos
Images
Herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm - Illustration Thumbnail

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm

This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern, seen here on the arm, follows a dermatome.

Illustration

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest - Illustration Thumbnail

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest

This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles often follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern is called a dermatome. The linear distribution of the nerve in the skin is very easily seen in this photograph.

Illustration

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers - Illustration Thumbnail

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers

This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles often follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern is called a dermatome.

Illustration

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the back - Illustration Thumbnail

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the back

This photograph shows clusters of blisters (vesicles) and redness (erythema) caused by herpes zoster (shingles). The pattern follows a dermatome. The area may burn or sting before the appearance of these vesicles. Early treatment with an antiviral drug (within 24 hours of the appearance of the vesicles) may prevent progression or reduce the time the infection is active (duration).

Illustration

Vaccines - Illustration Thumbnail

Vaccines

Vaccines are used to boost your immune system and prevent many diseases, some of which are serious or life-threatening. Vaccines “teach“ your body how to defend itself when germs, such as viruses or bacteria, invade it. After exposure to the vaccine, your immune system learns to recognize and attack the viruses or bacteria if you are exposed to them later in life. As a result, you will not become ill. Or, if you do get the illness, you will likely have a milder infection. Vaccines are very safe and very effective at protecting against certain serious diseases.

Illustration

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm - Illustration Thumbnail

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm

This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern, seen here on the arm, follows a dermatome.

Illustration

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest - Illustration Thumbnail

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest

This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles often follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern is called a dermatome. The linear distribution of the nerve in the skin is very easily seen in this photograph.

Illustration

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers - Illustration Thumbnail

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers

This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles often follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern is called a dermatome.

Illustration

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the back - Illustration Thumbnail

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the back

This photograph shows clusters of blisters (vesicles) and redness (erythema) caused by herpes zoster (shingles). The pattern follows a dermatome. The area may burn or sting before the appearance of these vesicles. Early treatment with an antiviral drug (within 24 hours of the appearance of the vesicles) may prevent progression or reduce the time the infection is active (duration).

Illustration

Vaccines - Illustration Thumbnail

Vaccines

Vaccines are used to boost your immune system and prevent many diseases, some of which are serious or life-threatening. Vaccines “teach“ your body how to defend itself when germs, such as viruses or bacteria, invade it. After exposure to the vaccine, your immune system learns to recognize and attack the viruses or bacteria if you are exposed to them later in life. As a result, you will not become ill. Or, if you do get the illness, you will likely have a milder infection. Vaccines are very safe and very effective at protecting against certain serious diseases.

Illustration

 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
© 1997-ADAM Company Logo All rights reserved.